I have a confession to make. I hate stage directions. I execute my finest to ignore them.Much of the moment, phase directions are descriptions of the original production. Of course, as soon as you read a manuscript, there"s no method to recognize which phase directions come from the writers and which come from the original director"s staging. I guess I usage phase directions the exact same method my father provided to usage the assembly instructions that came through my playthings –they"re the last resort after you"ve tried every little thing else.I"m only half kidding. In reality, I usage the phase directions so sporadically that when I dodesire to use them, I have to put a star next to them in my manuscript, to remind myself.Otherwise, fuck "em.So I"m difficult at work figuring out the staging for Bonnie & Clyde. I discussed in an previously post that I intend to change dramatically the original staging of the songs "What Was Good Enough for You" and also "Dyin" Ain"t So Bad." But not just the staging; I think these songs need to be approached in a different way, as acting scenes, quite than soliloquies. On Broadmeans, Laura Osnes as Bonnie obtained all Broadway-verklempt (i.e., showing too much emovement, however not "earning" it) during "Dyin" Ain"t So Bad," and also by the end, she can barely finish the song with her stage tears. And the Tony goes to... not her.I"m not certain if it"s the fault of Osnes, the director, the writers, or ssuggest a casualty of the massive transforms they made in the show between the La Jolla manufacturing and also Broadmeans. I remember once I first saw the show, this moment felt a tiny weird to me, yet I wasn"t mindful of why I felt that way.Now I recognize.It"s because the verklempt Bonnie that was falling acomponent during "Dyin" Ain"t So Bad" wasn"t the exact same challenging Bonnie we had actually recognized with the remainder of the present. I think periodically actors automatically assume that their very own organic reactivity to something is likewise their character"s herbal reaction. But Laura Osnes isn"t Bonnie Parker. Laura Osnes doesn"t live in the Dust Bowl in the time of the Depression, and she doesn"t live in excessive poverty and hopelessness. Why must we assume that life on these terms is much better than fatality for this fucked up kid? Who are we to make that assumption?Is this song about the Depression as much as it is about Bonnie?Jeff Gunn writes in Go Dvery own Together, “On the day she met Clyde Barrowhead, nineteen-year-old Bonnie Parker’s life was also in finish shambles. Everything that could be wrong in it, was. She’d shed her project and also couldn’t discover an additional. The handsome young husband also she’d meant to make all her romantic dreams come true was gone for great. After years of predicting she’d be a renowned star on Broadway, or possibly a renowned poet, she was still a nobody in the Dallas slums. It was enough to make her cry, and also she frequently did.”


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Look at the character in the show– Bonnie succeeds in escaping that life, and she has no illusions about the price she"ll pay. In Act II, Bonnie reads Clyde her finished poem about them, and also it ends with their deaths. In Go Dvery own Together, Gunn writes, “Bonnie told her mother that it was unavoidable that Clyde would certainly die and, as soon as he did, she wanted to die via him. For a readjust, she was matter-of-reality instead of dramatic.”She was matter-of-fact rather of dramatic.I think the essential to "Dyin" Ain"t So Bad" is Bonnie"s conviction. We understand she"s been reasoning about this. I think she totally believes what she"s saying. She"s concluded that being through Clyde till-death-do-them-component is a far much better fate than leaving him, waiting for him to be killed by the cops, and living the rest of her life without him. I"m sure tright here are older couples who"ve been together all their lives, that feel similarly, that living without the other would be worse than death. I think my mommy feels that way around my stepfather. She"s actually shelp she really hopes she dies prior to he does, and I bet you"ve heard human being in your household say the exact same thing. Bonnie"s hopelessly immature and also intense love (remarkably choose Shakespeare"s Juliet) gives her that same conviction. And crying throughout the song completely undermines that and shorttransforms the character.The lyric takes on new definition if you approach it my method, no tears, no telescoping of the tragic finishing, just a straightforward statement of belief, simply an honest attempt to make Blanche understand how Bonnie feels. I told Larissa, who"s playing Bonnie for us, to exercise the song smiling. Not that we necessarily desire that in performance (perhaps...), but it will assist fend off the urge to let it go weepy.Dyin" ain"t so poor,Not if you both go together;Only once one"s left behindDoes it gain sad.But a brief and also lovin" life,That ain"t so negative.If this is a simple statement of fact, quite than a frightened rationalization, the lyric makes more feeling, and it gets a lot deeper. If we take the lyric at face value, that she really believes this, then we instantly ask ourselves: is she crazy or would certainly I feel the exact same way?If Bonnie doesn"treally think this and is just spanning up her sadness, that question never before gets asked.She goes on:I only hope to god that I go first.I couldn"t live on memories;I"m sorry yet I"m not that solid.There are some points in lifeYou can not replace;A love favor ours do not take place twice.When all his days are through,Mine will certainly be also.On a pucount technical level, notification just how bit rhyme tbelow is here. This score as a whole is overflowing through internal rhymes, double- and triple-rhymes, and alliteration. But not right here. Sondheim has a ascendancy that rhyme amounts to knowledge and/or visibility of mind. So the less intelligent, the even more emotional, or the more panicked a character gets, the much less they rhyme (look at the verses of "Getting Married Today" inCompany). The more intelligent, more intellectual, more analytical a character is, the even more they rhyme (look at "Now" inA Little Night Music). This lyric in "Dyin" Ain"t So Bad" is pure emotion, so just 2 words rhyme in the first verse, and only 2 at the extremely end of the second verse. More rhyme would certainly gain in the way of what she"s saying.
So, is Bonnie nuts, wanting to die? Or carry out you understand also just how she feels? Bonnie"s lived life without Clyde and via Clyde, and being through him has been infinitely better. Notice her lyric in the song"s bridge:I"ve met boys that talk "bout ranches and horses,And they do not carry out much for me;I don"t have to end up in a rocking chair.Seems you gain to live your life just once;If that"s just how it"s gotta be,I"d quite breathe in life than dusty air.Notice that rhyme has actually went back. These lines aren"t expressions of pure emotion; they"re analytical. Bonnie is comparing her dreams to Blanche"s, and each of us in the audience will certainly draw our very own conclusions around which fate we"d fairly have. But weirdly, in the script and in the Broadmethod production, Bonnie sang the first 4 lines, and also then Blanche left the phase. That does not make any kind of sense to me. See why I ignore stage directions?Look at the dialogue leading up to this song:BLANCHE: The 2 of them are out doin" God knows what and you can just sit there favor that.BONNIE: Yes I deserve to.BLANCHE: You"re as crazy as he is.BONNIE: You keep talkin" favor that and you simply can be the initially perchild I kill.BLANCHE: (pause) The two of you deserve each other.BONNIE: Yes we execute.BLANCHE: I don"t understand also. You"re an attrenergetic woguy. I"m sure you might have actually any type of man you collection your sights on. Why are you here?BONNIE: Why are you right here, Blanche?BLANCHE: I am tryin" to speak my husband also from obtaining himself eliminated. For some stupid reason, he feels obliged to be here.BONNIE: Maybe there"s just not sufficient excitement to save him at residence.BLANCHE: Our life would certainly be perfect if it wasn"t for you and Clyde.BONNIE: You just think you"re so a lot better than everybody, don"t you?BLANCHE: I am just trying to be the finest perchild I deserve to be in the eyes of the Lord.BONNIE: And has that been fun, Blanche? You enjoyin" life?BLANCHE: I am grateful for eexceptionally day I spend on God"s good Planet.BONNIE: Take a look approximately, Blanche. God"s great Planet is dried up. It"s dead.BLANCHE: You are so completely and also utterly lost, all I can carry out is pray for you.BONNIE: Don"t waste your time, Blanche. I have actually every little thing I desire.BLANCHE: (pause) You understand, they"re going to kill Clyde as soon as they catch him.BONNIE: If they catch him.BLANCHE: And they"re probably going to kill you, too.BONNIE: They better.BLANCHE: You can"t tell me you ain"t scared.The music comes in and Bonnie replies, "Dyin" ain"t so bad, not if you both go together. Only when one"s left behind does it gain sad. But a brief and lovin" life, that ain"t so negative." After all that, Blanche just walks out...???No.
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This song isn"t an interior monologue; this is a proceeding conversation. Bonnie is making the situation to Blanche for her worldsee. I do not see any type of other way to review this dialogue, and also the song is a straight response to Blanche"s last line of dialogue. So what factor does Blanche have actually for leaving in the middle of Bonnie"s answer? None, really. Also in the original manufacturing, in the middle of the song, Bonnie picks up her poeattempt notebook and also starts composing this lyric in her book, as she sings it. But why? Has her conversation through Blanche turned right into poetry? Is she formulating these thoughts for the first time? Is she trying to convince herself? Is this a poem or is this (musical) dialogue?I assume you"ve already identified that I think there"s a far better solution. We"re gonna leave Blanche onphase and let Bonnie sing the whole song to Blanche. I think Bonnie has actually thought about all this a lot. I think she"s recognized her very own mind around all this she initially met Clyde. Why take away Bonnie"s scene partner? Why not offer Larissa someone to play off of? Why not provide more phase time to Bonnie and Blanche"s relationship, which is plainly the many interesting after Bonnie and Clyde"s?From the beginning we"ve checked out that in some methods, Bonnie and Blanche are in the very same position and feel the same points, but they are likewise polar opposites in specific means (wanting a rocking chair, wanting to readjust their man). In truth, their signature songs in the present are polar opposite–Bonnie"s lust for fame in "The Picture Show" versus Blanche"s desires of a quiet residence life in "That"s What You"d Call a Dream." In their duet, "You Love Who You Love," the sentiments in their verses are entirely opposed to each various other, however they sing the choruses together bereason they both love their men extremely deeply – and also they harmonize, which of course is musical theatre proof that they are connected. (More on that in one more short article...)Our brand-new music director Jeffrey and also I store discovering new details and brand-new depth in both the music and lyrics, which is such fun! The actors have actually learned the score, and tonight we have actually our read-through-sing-with, so everyone have the right to get a feeling of the adundertaking ahead.Then it"s my turn. Blocking and some inescapable Millerography...Can. Not. Wait.Long Live the Musical!Scott


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1 comments: Unknown | August 22, 2014 at 11:47 PM
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WOW! Very prodiscovered look at this song and also the characters in the present, as many kind of times as I've listened to the actors album I'v never before believed of it in such that way! So excited for this show!